Donate to La Vida Education
You are here:  About Us > About the Founder
  |  Login

About La Vida Education in Nicaragua

About La Vida Education in Nicaragua

LA VIDA Education - Aaron PickLA VIDA Education was founded by Aaron Pick in 2003, following a trip where he visited each country in Central America and spent time observing schools and libraries. As the son of two teachers, and a former teacher himself in the United States, Aaron was struck by the lack of educational resources in Nicaragua. At the same time, he was amazed by the desire that youth showed for learning, despite the fact that the median level of education in the country was 6th grade. Aaron moved to Nicaragua in 2003 and spent three full years living there while developing LA VIDA Education and equipping a local staff team to run what is now the educational community center. He spent most of his time living in the town of San Juan de Oriente, Nicaragua and visited schools in the region on a daily basis to better determine what educational solutions might prove to be most effective.

In 2006, Aaron moved back to the United States to get his MBA from Berkeley, and he has been running LA VIDA Education on from the United States ever since while local staff in Nicaragua operate all programs on the ground.

For more information about LA VIDA Education, please feel free to contact Aaron directly at 510-295-9348 or aaron@lavidaeducation.org.
 

Some of Aaron’s random memories from Nicaragua
  • Playing in the town soccer league and having everyone cheer whenever the ball came within ten feet of him
  • Being invited to serve as the Grand Marshal for the local parade after forming a soccer league for girls
  • Trying to avoid the barbed-wire clotheslines that Nicaraguans use in their backyards (and are typically about forehead level for anyone 6’-3”)
  • Sleeping on a cot for two years in a small one room house with a cement floor and a leaky tin roof
  • Consistently waking up at 4AM to the sounds of roosters, dogs, fireworks, church bells, and anything else that is loud
  • Waking up again to the neighbor’s favorite song, Who Let the Dogs Out, which was played at full blast every morning at 6AM

 

  • Playing in the town soccer league and having everyone cheer whenever the ball came within ten feet of him
  • Being invited to serve as the Grand Marshal for the local parade after forming a soccer league for girls
  • Trying to avoid the barbed-wire clotheslines that Nicaraguans use in their backyards (and are typically about forehead level for anyone 6’-3”)
  • Sleeping on a cot for two years in a small one room house with a cement floor and a leaky tin roof
  • Consistently waking up at 4AM to the sounds of roosters, dogs, fireworks, church bells, and anything else that is loud
  • Waking up again to the neighbor’s favorite song, Who Let the Dogs Out, which was played at full blast every morning at 6AM